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Best Trees for Front Yard

Are you looking to update your front yard landscaping? Adding trees can provide beauty, shade, and privacy. A strategic selection can even increase your property value by 14 percent! The trick is to plant the right kinds of trees in the right places. Here’s a list of the best trees for a front yard depending on what you want to accomplish, as well as tips to care for your newly transplanted trees.

Consider Your Region­­

Since different trees thrive in different climates, you should make your selection based on the hardiness zone in which you live. As a rule of thumb, trees that are readily available at your local nursery should be easy to transplant and care for in your region.

Best Small Trees for a Front Yard

If you don’t have much space, but you still want to add beauty and interest to your small front yard, opt for an ornamental tree. These species are known for their flowers and/or fruit in the spring and beautiful foliage in the fall. Here are some of our favorites:

Best Shade Trees for a Front Yard

Do you envision sitting under a large shade tree in your front yard? If so, you need one that will mature into a tall, striking tree with a large canopy. Keep in mind that shade trees take years to fill in and require regular pruning to maintain a healthy shape and size. Our top picks include:

  • Oak tree (Zones 3-10, depending on the variety)
  • Larger Maples (Zones 3-9, depending on the variety)
  • Golden Rain tree (Zones 6-9)

Best Trees for Front Yard Privacy

The ideal way to achieve a natural privacy screen is with compact conifers. Some of the best options for this purpose include:

  • Arborvitae (Zones 2-7)
  • Spruce (Zones 2-8, depending on the variety)
  • Pine (Zones 2-10, depending on the variety)

How to Care for New Front Yard Trees

After purchasing a mature tree from your local nursery, follow these steps to transplant and care for it during its first few weeks in your front yard:

  • Choose a location that will provide the tree with adequate light, water, and soil conditions.
  • Water the ground one day before transplanting to make the soil easier to dig up.
  • Dig a hole about three times wider than and just as deep as the tree’s root ball. Save the soil, making one pile for topsoil and another for subsoil. Water the hole.
  • Set the tree in the hole and remove the burlap from the root ball.
  • Fill in the hole, beginning with subsoil on the bottom and finishing with topsoil on top.
  • Water thoroughly. For the first week or two, water daily. Between three and 12 weeks, water every two to three days. After 12 weeks, water weekly for the next one to two years.
  • Consider adding mulch around the tree, being careful not to push it up onto the trunk, to maintain a steadier temperature and moisture level.
  • Refrain from fertilizing for at least one year so the tree rebuilds its roots rather than producing new foliage.

For expert help deciding which trees to plant in your front yard, contact The Grounds Guys®. Then, count on our ongoing tree services to beautify your yard and help your trees thrive. Request a job estimate today!

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